beading, beadwork, color, glass beads, jewelry design, seed beads

A very long beading design post…

I actually have been able to get some design work done, recently. Essentially, I was able to visit a bead store — like a real-life, in-person bead store. I’ve said before that I have hesitated to work with natural stones because things can get very expensive, very fast. That’s still true.

There’s also the fact that as I’m working, I realize that it isn’t entirely worth it to make things to sell…unless, that is, I’m using some leftovers of other projects that I otherwise would not. Because of the time it takes to design things, and the time it takes to construct things, and then unmake and remake projects as I revise the design…it costs me so much in time that what I make becomes prohibitively expensive, if I’m charging by the hour. I’d rather not be designing against the clock, especially when I could regain the money lost in design more easily, simply by going to work more.

In any case…I have an Amazonite puffed square cabochon that I got at a recent convention. It’s a pastel green with blue overtones, white-streaked, glossy, with a hairline fracture. I’ve decided to pair it with some Aquamarine 8mm rounds (pale green-blue, displaying some silver internal reflections; mostly otherwise opaque), and some Pink Botswana Agate 6mm rounds (pale salmon-pink, mauve and white, opaque). These are now the center, anchoring elements of this piece.

So essentially…I’m designing around a cabochon; particularly where it comes to color and texture. I am echoing the color and gloss of the Amazonite cabochon with the Aquamarine (which is slightly paler than the Amazonite), and contrasting that with a secondary supporting point in the Botswana Agate. That’s why the Agates are smaller than the Aquamarines. When working with natural stones, it can be hard to find them in usable shapes (other than rounds)…

When I got these home, I did start looking through my project box to weed out some beads that were too warm. I know that “warm” when it comes to blues, means “violet” tending (as violet is closer to red — green is considered a “cooler” color, though that’s counterintuitive to me); in this case, I weeded violets which were closer to Cobalt Blue (a deep, intense blue-violet when in glass). I kept greens and blues which were substantially greener, ranging more towards yellow. I also added a good amount of pinks, warm white ranging to pale gold, violet which is closer to red, ambers, and browns (“Smokey [sic] Topaz”, “Crystal Celsian”).

This was a generative task, not a selection task. It is, however, much more stimulating and inspiring than what I had before. The next task is to try putting some of these together; most of the designs that I’ve made which really made leaps in innovative construction, have occurred when I’ve just tried to assemble things in any way I could (keeping in mind that threads need protection, and that bugle beads, unless something is done to stop them, will easily shear thread in two: these are practical constraints). There has been a basic idea of what I’ve been going for, but it has often been abandoned as I found better ways to do what I’m trying to do…or an alternate path to success.

I decided to go for stranding as a possibility, as I’ve realized that a more complicated design is not necessarily a better design.

And the seed beads…

Having said that, I still want to try St. Petersburg Chain. I’ve been looking for some excuse to try it; I’m just not sure if this is the right project for it. I’ve separated out some colors of Czech seed beads which echo the Botswana Agate…but to be honest, they’re a little dull against the Japanese ones. For instance, I have an old tube of “Ceylon Lt Peach” (unknown brand, likely Japanese) 11/0 seed beads, which are just…brighter, than my Cheyenne Pink 8/0 Czech seed beads. I could still use them together, but I should not overuse anything too dull.

No, I don’t know why the half-hanks of Czech seed beads I have, are duller than the Czech fire-polished crystals I have…and the Czech pressed-glass SuperDuos and MiniDuos. When I got them, I was looking for a solid color throughout the glass, which is normally more resistant to fading, while sacrificing some of the bright colors of surface-dyed or color-lined beads (which are known to be more often susceptible to fading or other color change).

Note that I don’t consider surface dyeing (like the use of Sol-Gel) to be the same thing as a surface treatment such as Aurora Borealis (AB), Luster, Iris, Vitrail, Capri (I have some opinions about Capri’s durability…but, later), or Ceylon. At least, that’s not what I mean by it. I also realize that my Light Peach Ceylon beads may indeed be surface-dyed. It was so long ago that I didn’t think to mark the vial as permanent or possibly prone to fading. I probably also didn’t think that I’d be trying to remember any cautions at the store, 10 or more years later.

But no, I did not expect to find a clean, bright pink or a clean mauve-grey in an affordable stone, either. These both match the Japanese beads better.

There is, still, a range of quality, here…it’s important when buying stranded beads, to look for size uniformity (at minimum), unless you aren’t doing anything (like a beading stitch/weave) that depends on things being even. That is: not all “Czech” seed beads are the same quality. I’ve even seen half-hanks of beads with other beads of the same color stuck to their outsides, which look like there was paint that dried with two beads touching. (I don’t particularly like glass beads which look like they have paint on them…it’s a reason I don’t use a lot of the newer multi-hole beads.)

The only way that I really can even tell that they’re Czech (or from someone trying to pass themselves off as Czech) is either through the catalog description (when purchased online), or through the method of sale. Czech seed beads are generally sold stranded and tied together in bundles of 6 or 12 strands. Japanese seed beads are generally sold loose, in vials or bags. They have different brands, sizing regulations and shape standards…and apparently, at least somewhat different methods of attaining their colors, or a different aesthetic which causes the companies to aim to produce different palettes.

In buying beads at conventions, however…you may not know who made what, unless you ask. Vendors may also not recall their sourcing, on top of it (especially if they’re a Mom-and-Pop operation). Right now, I only know one rocaille (round, uncut seed bead) manufacturer from the Czech Republic, which is Preciosa Ornela. (I’m not counting manufacturers of shaped seed beads.) However, I am very sure that they aren’t the only game in town.

I also wouldn’t put it past other manufacturers to try and pass their material off as though it has the quality that “Czech” beads are known for. Though I intend only to use Japanese and Czech seed beads in my work, that doesn’t mean that my suppliers are paying attention to how their customers think about quality.

I’m thinking that some people would rather get a low price than a quality product. The problem with that: low-priced products can also easily be low-quality products, and I don’t know that anyone on the receiving end is overtly asking for anything more. Raised prices for low-quality products would mean that the higher-quality products win out because they are higher-quality (and then there is no reason not to buy the higher quality instead). You can see how that works.

I did, once, buy a terrifyingly expensive half-hank of Dark Copper (I’ll just call them that) 8/0s: $17 for 6 strands. Very even in width; uniform, beautiful finish. They get higher than that — for instance, when there’s a special metallic coating which requires gold — but in the majority of cases, they don’t range higher than $15-$20 per half-hank. My low end of the 8/0s is currently $4.25 for six strands of something that looks like Sleeping Beauty Turquoise, just in glass. Keep in mind, though, I don’t have a sample of Sleeping Beauty Turquoise here to compare and see if it’s any more intense; the beads just bring it to mind.

I got the 8/0s to make knotted bracelets. More on that another time, hopefully.

So, the half-hank of Cheyenne Pink 8/0s ($7.50 for 6 strands) are beautiful on their own. The only thing is, the Pink Botswana Agate outshines them and makes them look dull in comparison. With too many of the glass beads, I could also unintentionally dull down the stones. The colors in the stones are just much cleaner. Why? I really don’t know. I might have to be a chemist to know. I have seen at least one text on the chemistry of glass colors…and I am not interested enough in how they’re made, to go back into a hard science.

That’s another reason to buy stones that you can see in-person, before purchase, though. It’s much easier to mix-and-match a dominant stone against a wall of other stones and find a perfect complement, than it is to flip back and forth between online windows, or bring up multiple windows showing multiple products (and then hope the photography is reasonably true-to-life).

I’ve delayed posting this because I have wanted to add images…it would be of use to me to remember what this particular project box looks like. There’s a lot of information, that is, in just seeing what I’m dealing with (and how it differs from what I was dealing with before — which I did not photograph, because it was that uninspiring). Adding the pink and violet, along with that pale green, it helps a lot. They’re all unified, in a design sense, because they’re all pastel tones.

However, because I’m still in training at my job, I’ve been working a lot of the time, and studying, eating, and sleeping for a lot of the rest of the time. That is: I haven’t had a lot of time to write, much less to take and optimize photos. I was lucky I had time enough to go out on the weekend…

This current writing, I began on Sunday. I’ll get beyond the point of relevance, if I delay for much longer. The obvious choice would be to hold off on posting until Friday or Saturday…but this is aging in my consciousness, and nagging me and causing me to waste time filling it out further. I should post.

craft, glass beads, seed beads

GAAAA…Washing beads.

So…in lieu of going to the Walnut Creek Bead & Design show this weekend, I found myself in San Francisco and took the opportunity to look inside General Bead, a store I’ve long known about and never visited. I have checked out their website, but I don’t remember having come away from it with a good feeling. I decided to look into their physical storefront today.

The store itself was on Minna, in the South of Market (SoMa) area. Minna in this area is kind of…run-down. The storefront almost seems to be off of an alley (the alley being Minna itself), in a way which very much reminded me of Mr. Zebra off of Telegraph in Berkeley (down to the spray-painted facade…and the local aroma, common to most urban areas here, which…anyone who lives here will know).

On going in, we were immediately greeted by an employee, who explained the method for ordering materials. This was kind. It was also nice that the store inside is not as modest as the storefront would suggest. In particular, they have a lot of Czech seed beads, in bags and in hanks. However, most of the stock is behind the counter and not accessible to the public. One fills out a form and the staff retrieve the items, which disallows close inspection prior to purchase.

It was noticeable that they had barely any multi-hole beads (though I did find some “Piggy” beads — just not in colors I would want), which is something that I can understand, as it’s difficult to tell which shape will be in demand at any one time (and new shapes are being continually introduced). I wouldn’t be surprised if trying to keep up with the multi-hole bead craze put some of the bead stores I’ve known (particularly Baubles & Beads, in Berkeley), out of business.

And, okay, I’m just going to put it out here right now: one of the packs of beads I got from them has what looks like part of the carapace of the abdomen, and two legs, of some kind of bug. I don’t want to post an image. I don’t want to remember it. At first I thought that it was a scale of a tiny pine cone. Then I identified two shed legs inside the package. So…thaaat is the gross part that I’ve been trying not to talk about so soon, but I might forget about it if I don’t mention it now.

But to be understanding, a lot of these beads came out of bulk packages behind the counter, in boxes, to be sealed up on exit in take-home packs…it would be incredibly easy for insects to live out their entire lives back there. Eating cardboard and stuff. Considering what the surrounding area looked like, I wasn’t entirely surprised…

That’s not to say that I didn’t like the experience, once inside the store. That’s to say that there are some bug issues, likely arising from the location.

I did take that hank of beads out (this was sealed at the store), and found a bunch of dust left behind inside the package. Then I went and got a fine plastic colander and bowl set that I purchased from the small Asian dollar store for $2 before it closed, and I used that as a large wash basin to wash the entire hank of beads. In Dawn dishwashing detergent. Twice.

I probably could have done more, but I passed the point of, “squeaky clean,” to the point that the oil from my hands began rubbing off on the beads. Because I am somewhat paranoid about germs…I didn’t want to wash these things until my hands cracked. There’s a fine line between being clean, and being so germ-phobic that one inadvertently exposes oneself to more than one has to.

These were rinsed many times, probably for about as long as I washed them, or longer.

Then I took them and put them in a little yogurt cup with some soft disposable hand towels, where they will be drying until at least tomorrow. I don’t recall having washed an entire hank of beads in this way in quite a long time, if I ever have at all. However, this is the third cup of beads I’ve washed, tonight.

Another was a set of what appear to be White Heart 4mm round druks from Michaels; that is, round beads with a white core (visible at the drill holes) and something red on the outside (red glass? a layer of dye?), which did bleed (brownish) a little. (Not all druks are white at the core; this is the first time I have bought a set like this, and it was accidental. I did buy actual solid-color transparent red druks, today. The thing is, it’s hard to tell that they’re red, because [as is my constant lament] the color is so intense. The White Hearts, on the other hand, are visibly red, which is why I got them.) I had set these aside primarily because I wasn’t sure if they were colorfast, but they’re seeming to hold up well.

The other wash round, this time, was two sets of Brown Iris Czech Ring beads (from General Bead), which I have since determined cannot be used with the inside of the hole, visible. This is largely because the beads themselves are not finished on the insides of the holes. The outside edges are fine. The inside edges are not. On top of that, I’ve noticed some crazing on the surface of most of these beads, probably from internal stress on the glass. They’ll just have to be used with that in mind. I have a use for them; I largely washed them because sometimes beads will just get dust on them, and it’s hard to see what they actually look like.

I’ve bought Ring beads on two other occasions, and can’t recall if they were similarly unfinished on the insides. The Olivine-color ones, which are 9.5x3mm and which I got a long time ago, are relatively fine on the outside and inside, and not crazed, though they also do look a little frosted and rough in the center. The Black ones I have, which are 8×2.5mm, look a little less finished on the inside edges, and I can’t tell if there is any crazing, because they’re black.

The ones I got this time, which are Brown Iris (basically a multicolored metallic finish, but more durable than Galvanized finishes at least were,at one time), are 7.5×2.5mm. Now that they’re drying, they don’t look too bad; rather like unfinished metal; but they still look unfinished, like the inside is not meant to be seen.

The big thing that I like about General Bead is its selection of size 6/0 Czech seed beads, which have been a bit difficult to find locally since Baubles & Beads went under. I believe the smallest pack of these available is 50 grams, which is about twice the size of a B&B vial (which I believe was 22 grams, though I’m not sure, especially as I don’t think it was noted at the store, and I don’t have a gram scale); the cost is also very decent, at around $3.50 for most of the 6/0 packs I bought. So that’s basically like paying $1.75 for a 25-gram tube (this could be the reason Yelp lists General Bead with only one “$” out of a possible “$$$$”).

The drawback I can see here is that a lot of their stock is either solid-color and opaque, or solid-color and transparent, without much funny surface treatment like Vitrail or Celsian or Apollo, or foil- or color-lining. Not that I miss the color-lining. :) However, transparent beads (even large ones) have a tendency to drop back in compositions. Solids tend to advance, as do metal-lined beads. But still, it is nice to have some subtle effects…like the Copper-Lined Rose Matte (Aurora Borealis?) beads I left there because I was pretty sure they were dyed.

I have read a lot of things about surface treatments not being permanent on Czech seed beads, however (and have had this issue before with Picasso beads, which are mottled from a surface treatment [some of which rubbed off, especially on my thread, while others did not]), so this could be a durability issue.

They did have some nice finds there, though, like bobbins of Super-Lon beading thread and Conso beading thread. I picked up a sample of each, to see if I like working with either. Also, there are odd sizes of Czech seed beads below size 6/0, almost down to the size of freakin’ sand; where you go, “how does anyone see these/fit a needle through these?” Their selection of druks and Fire-Polished beads is decent. They also have — man! — glass cabochons! In different colors! I picked up a few of these, just to practice bead embroidered bezels.

With that, I think I’m gonna go, for now. I realize I haven’t put up photos…I will either post a separate entry with photos, or come back to this entry and insert photos, later. I should have time tomorrow, before the sun sets.

personal

Sleepy.

Well — there’s not much to report, mostly because I got to bed so late last night that I ended up taking a five-hour nap, today. I did get to the bead store, but only found part of what I was looking for — which is okay, because I did find some stuff with which to experiment. I also have other sources.

The biggest thing I’m a little upset about is the fact that I lost the daylight hours in which I could have taken photos of the things on which I’m working. (I have recently found that it’s okay to end a sentence with a preposition; don’t be surprised if it happens, but right now, it’s mostly outside of my comfort zone.) :)

I have recently found that going to bed early and then waking early is…a relatively good thing. Going to bed at 10:30 PM, for example, and then rising at 5:30 AM is doable, even if it looks extreme when I write it down. Not only do I get extra time so that I can avoid rushing to start my day (and can take a shower without rushing, before work), but I have the opportunity to get more hours of sleep, if I need them. I also have the ability to brush and floss my teeth and do the whole pre-bed routine, without worrying about a time crunch.

Right now, I’m sleepy again, and am heavily considering just going back to bed. This is amazing.

I might as well set the intention, as well, to start cataloging my beads in spreadsheet form. Whether this will make it to a database is yet to be seen…

beading, craft, design, glass beads, seed beads

Priorities.

I’ve been looking through my backposts…and have found information on where, about five years ago, I thought I’d be going with my jewelry. What I’m looking at in particular is information I noted while in the Business program at a nearby Community College. There was a bead show around that time period, and accordingly, I was trying to find an identity so that I could focus my purchases.

In my area, the local Bead Society used to be closely involved in two annual bead shows: I believe this was the “Bay Area Bead Extravanganza!” (or BABE!) and the Whole Bead Show. BABE! ceased operations in 2017. The Whole Bead Show is still around, but isn’t convening in my area again, until this November.

These shows used to be spaced out so that one would happen approximately in May (I think? I keep getting March and May mixed up), and one in November. The BSNC (Bead Society of Northern California) would advertise both of these, but it seems there has generally been a downturn in interest, participation, or just awareness, within the last few years.

I have been thinking, however, that local sellers would seek alternate local venues. One of them, now passed for me, is Stitches West (the link will take you to their upcoming shows — they’re all over the country). The only reason I know about them is that Marion (of jewelsinfiber.com) had linked to them from her website.

I didn’t go to Stitches West, but from what I gather, it was basically focused around fiber arts (knitting, crochet, weaving, embroidery, etc…though that’s just what I gather as an uninformed outsider).

Anyhow, there’s a Bead & Design Show in Walnut Creek, in about three weeks. I missed Stitches West (which I would have gone to simply for C-Lon, which is silly, I know now), but I don’t plan to miss the Bead & Design Show. I would be going to this show majorly to visit one known vendor, which is the Garden of Beadin’.

I would link you to the Garden of Beadin’s website, but it lacks a bit of intended functionality (inability to delete all items from one’s shopping cart, at least); and I’m not sure if it was the source of some computer trouble a while back, now that I think of it. (This also could have been because of other online bead retailers’ websites, however: I know for a fact that at least one of them is giving me some gunk.) Because of this, it’s best to visit them in person. They also have a print catalog, which may take the place of a functional website…I’m not sure, as I haven’t seen it yet.

However: when you see their displays, you’ll know why people buy from them. They have a lot of Czech seed beads, and some Japanese seed beads, which are majorly the reason I’ve gone to them.

Now that the bead store, Baubles & Beads — formerly on Shattuck Avenue in Berkeley — is closed, it’s not so easy to locally source Czech seed beads in size 6/0. I prefer the Czech 6/0 beads because they’re more donut-shaped than cylinder-shaped (like Japanese 6/0 seed beads are), so they are good for uses in which Japanese beads aren’t as aesthetically pleasant (like Right-Angle Weave).

There was also a store in Pinole called Peggy’s Perfections which would sell strands of Czech beads in different sizes. From what I can tell, I think Peggy’s business also went under, though I can’t say how long ago without doing some extraneous research.

I should note that I’m fairly certain these stores closed because of online competition, though when you’re buying beads to the tune of once a week, having a brick-and-mortar place to visit is important as well as convenient. Because so many local East Bay bead stores have closed, I’m kind of leaning towards telling you about a couple that I have visited.

Right now, Beadazzled on Solano in Berkeley is getting a lot of my time…and money, fortunately for the shop owner! I’m basically happy that there’s again someone in the Berkeley area who has decided to set up shop. They have a good selection of seed beads and some of the newer multihole beads, plus specialty ones like Czech O-Beads…and basically a wall of Czech glass. Because I’m into bead weaving and micro-macramé, I go there for things like these.

The other place that I visit occasionally is Blue Door Beads, in Piedmont. It’s been so long since I’ve been there that I don’t feel entirely comfortable giving too much of an idea of their stock, but I know they sell stone beads (moreso than Beadazzled), individually and in strands. I also got a lot of my 3mm and 4mm fire-polished beads from there.

There is also a shop in Concord called Just Bead It!, which (along with Beadazzled on Solano) sells the elusive 5mm Czech fire-polished rounds. At the time I last visited, they also had some of the rarer beads like Dragonscales (the glass ones)…though I still haven’t used mine. They’re tiny and delicate, and have tiny and delicate holes.

Anyhow, I started out this post talking about, basically, trying to find a brand identity, which I’m much, much closer to, now (if I have not already sussed out what I need to in order to begin). Over the years…I’ve found myself drawn most to beadweaving and micro-macramé. I also find wirework very much to be of use, however; some of my favorite creations could not have been done just using thread or cord (I may have to upload some photos here to help remind myself — I’m particularly thinking of earrings).

I may want to get into hot metalwork in order to do things like construct my own clasps…the thing is, the setup for that is so involved, and can be expensive and hazardous. The upshot is that metals sellers sometimes sell metal at market (commodity) value, meaning that it’s — in the long run — likely cheaper to make things oneself, than it is to repeatedly buy things like clasps and earwires (which can be outlandishly priced).

Right now I’m looking at trying my hand at bead embroidery (in the vein of Jamie Cloud Eakin), but to be honest, I doubt I have ever done it, and I don’t know if I’ll like it. If I don’t like it, I may be turning back to hot metalwork.

In a similar vein, I can see myself eventually getting a kiln to work with ceramics and Precious Metal Clay (PMC). The drawback to this is bi-fold: first, will I be allergic to PMC like I’m allergic to Fimo? second, the kiln — any kiln — is expensive. However, I already know that I have skill at ceramics. I also already know that I like ceramics.

The major thing to hold me back here, besides the capital investment, is the fact that I may have to deal with silica vapor from firing ceramics…which is not a good thing to breathe in, but I didn’t have a problem with it, in high school. Of course, I probably didn’t realize my own mortality in high school…

However, the possibility of making my own ceramic components is interesting…and possibly productive, in the future (especially as I’m into micro-macramé, at this point). After, that is, I figure out where to live.

Right now, for the short-term, I need to be looking at glass beads: particularly Czech glass beads, Japanese and Czech seed beads (particularly sizes 6/0, 8/0, and 15/0), druks, and likely crystals (like Swarovski, which stopped using lead in its lead crystal, and as such can’t be called “lead crystal” anymore). I should also be looking at cabochons — large and inexpensive ones — with which to practice bead embroidery.

All of that sounds solid. There’s also the issue, though, of color schemes. Right now, my color palettes lean towards blue, green, violet, brown, and some reds. Yellow and orange aren’t as present, though I do have a lot of nicely muted colors. When working with paint, I realized that sometimes a bit of a color which you didn’t think you needed was actually necessary for something to turn out the way you wanted. I should keep this in mind…

The reason for leaning away from gemstone beads is the fact that gemstone jewelry gets very expensive, very quickly. I don’t know if I have to say more on that…