organization, sewing, storage

Housekeeping + Nepali blouse contemplation.

I intended last night to clean off the craft table today, so that I could use it for drawing or sewing. It didn’t happen. Basically, nothing of note happened until this evening, when I was able to complete my homework in half an hour (I expected it to be much harder than it was).

Right now we’re into Monday morning. Staying up isn’t really good for me (it took me years to regulate my sleep cycle to the point of functionality), but if I slept until evening, there’s a case to be made for not going back to sleep when I’m not tired. (There’s also a case, however, for not watching a computer screen this late at night: the blue light mimics daylight, and messes with melatonin release.)

I also know the key to readjusting my sleep patterns now, which is to take medication before the deep night…it slipped my mind until about midnight, tonight. That means I may be lethargic until late afternoon, tomorrow.

When you can predict this stuff, it’s easier to deal with it.

Tomorrow, it would be good to get back to studying (if I can handle it — I know avoidance was a reason for me to sleep, today [and it’s good for me to know that, and not be in denial about it]). I was able to get the 2nd edition of a book on Reference Interviewing (2019 edition!), in case I want to study before any job interviews.

Otherwise…the place needs to be cleaned up. Not just the craft table, but my bedroom and my office and my art storage area. The office in particular, needs to be made into a place that is able to be lived in; right now, it’s pretty sterile (there are minimal distractions, as I used to study in there).

That might actually be cathartic. The major issue I can see is dealing with the desk…it’s too high for a regular desk, as it was made to hold a monitor. Then, there’s a chair in there which is really comfortable, but doesn’t tuck in. The whole setup is kind of chaotic. I’m not sure what to do about it.

Then there are the meditation pillows and the “altar” space (from when I was interested in “mindfulness” meditation for health). The altar space has a low table I can sit at and draw, but it’s sitting on the floor…which I used to do all the time as a kid, but I’m not sure I’m up to it, as an adult.

There are four bookcases in that room, too — three of which, I’m using. I’m reluctant to move some of the stuff, though, out of concern I won’t be able to find it again. It makes sense to file it away, now — at least since I’ve completed my University work. I do have a vertical file, which I am thinking holds materials from my undergraduate days, but it’s not current. I could check and see what I can shift…but it likely isn’t going to be fun. Getting rid of archives is one of those things that makes me want to read everything to make sure it’s obsolete…even though that’s a monumental task.

Anyhow…I also have a ton of work to do with the craft table. There’s just stuff piled on stuff and beads and markers sitting out, etc. It would be different if I were doing something with the beads, but I’m not, and they’re just taking up space. It also doesn’t make sense to continue to accumulate the beads, if I’m not doing anything with them.

As for the bedroom, I need to vacuum and dust, at the least. My Dwarf Umbrella plant blew over the last time I opened my window — it still needs repotting (if it doesn’t already have a fruit fly infestation — I killed one in that room, last night). I also have a number of almost-empty storage containers that I may want to move into a storage room (or maybe they could hold some beads, in the art storage area?).

After I’ve listed all of that, it makes sense why I would find this more urgent than sewing, although I’m of half a mind to make the Nepali Blouse pattern, unaltered. I added in a good maybe 8″ to the front and back panels (I don’t like showing midriff unless I’m exercising), without realizing that this significantly alters the sewing line…and requires panel inserts.

So the collar and upper areas of that pattern are fine, great, even. It’s the length of the thing, and the width of the sleeves, that I don’t like. However, if I wore this with a wrap skirt, it’s a non-issue (as the wrap skirt covers me up to the bottom of my rib cage).

After I deal with cleaning this place up, maybe I’ll go back to that…with the idea that I can alter the piece if I want to, but I don’t have to. I probably won’t be able to tell whether it’s even a good idea, until I get to a certain stage of construction and can try it on. At that point, I can fold the front and back panels until I reach the optimal length, and then stitch over them.

Right now, I’m really tired! It’s after 1:30 AM here; I should get some rest.

garments, sewing

Starting work on blouse.

Today I put in a bit more work on a for-real version of the Folkwear Nepali Blouse, with the new pattern. Yesterday I was basically scoping out the requirements of the pattern and seeing how much material I actually have. I also overlocked the edges of my fabric and put it through the wash. Today consisted of cutting out the pattern pieces, or more properly: adjusting the paper pattern pieces, laying them out, pinning them down, transferring the markings, and cutting them out.

I added 4″ of length in the middle of the pattern, as my toile (muslin mockup) was so short as to be uncomfortable (my gridded cutting mat was of use, here). I am uncertain as to whether to extend the side slits above the added length, as the slits in the toile start right at my waist. I also would like to insert a panel (maybe a triangular or trapezoidal one) so that when the side slits do open, it shows the underlying fabric instead of an undershirt or my skin. I am not entirely certain how to do this yet, or if it would be more worth my time to construct an undershirt or sleeveless shell.

The issue with using a shell is that the front of the blouse is constructed so as to curve around the breasts; a shell will likely take away that bit of detail. Amazingly enough, the detail itself doesn’t make me uncomfortable; it may be because of the fabrics I’ve been using.

I’m used to stretch fabrics requiring underlayers because of all the “landscape detail” they show, by clinging. A crisp cotton or muslin doesn’t seem to have that problem — at least so, at this point. However…a clingy and low-cut tank top with a long hem, of the type I already have, would clear up the problem — and not require a huge inverted box pleat. The lack of modesty around the breasts wouldn’t then be an issue, because those areas would be covered by the blouse itself.

Right now I still have to mark and cut out the underarm gussets, the two back panels (though these are already pinned), and the ties.

I’ve been using white Saral paper as transfer paper, instead of the Dritz stuff from the fabric store. It works much better, at least so far. I’ve also been using a white marking pencil designed for quilting, though it’s super-soft! To mark the dots, notches, and squares on the pattern, I’ve been using a leather tooling stylus — something like an awl with a ball at the point. I just press on top of the pattern with the Saral paper underneath it. It does have a tendency to tear up the pattern, though.

It seems like the pattern paper now is more delicate than I’m used to. I’m using washi tape to piece together the extension panels, and even though it’s light and repositionable, it has still torn this paper, just like tissue paper.

The other thing I can mention is that I keep forgetting to place my cutting mat underneath the areas I’m marking. I’m not using a marking wheel with really deep teeth (of the type that I accidentally marked the table with before), but it’s still something to watch out for.

I also meant to mention last time, if I haven’t, that using a sewing machine in no way takes away from the pleasure of sewing for me. I was mildly surprised. It makes things go much more quickly and efficiently, though I am sure I will want to review my hand-stitching techniques (I may need slipstitch and basting in the near future, in addition to a way to hand-finish seams).