craft, organization, storage

Disorganized, despite it all

Yes, I spent at least 20 or 30 minutes tonight looking around for a vial of Crystal Celsian MiniDuos that were right in front of me, on the table. DIS-ORGANIZED. Or maybe just absent-minded. (Google “Crystal Celsian” to see photos of this surface treatment; it’s basically a light transparent gold.)

I’ve recently been dealing with the use of specialized bead shapes — SuperDuos, MiniDuos, 3mm Magatamas, 3x4mm Drops, O-beads, and Miyuki Spacer Beads (as versus Toho Demi Rounds, which is what I thought I had, last time I wrote).

I believe that I’m becoming interested, now, in more and different things, than the main design I worked out last. I suppose I did make two samples, one trial and two final versions…though I need to replace the clasp on one (the blue one), and I have identified at least one more colorway I could work through. Well, two: one in rose and green (like the second sample I made), and one in magenta and teal.

Yeah, that sounds kind of close, but in one, the pink dominates; in the second, the teal does. Right now, I’m interested more in the dusty rose one, as it looks less like a daisy chain than I believe the teal one may work out to appear. It has to do with color placement.

I should note the C-Lon colors I used in the previous three; the first two (Capri Blue 6/0s plus 4mm Green Iris fire-polished rounds) were “Eggplant”; the third was “Persian Indigo”. That’s in case I need to replace these spools, if the colors are still being made. The color was on a sticky band on the outside of the spool — designed for identification among many similar spools — not designed to be kept.

I’m trying to figure out a scalable method of reliably storing these things, and figuring out a way to keep notes on what I would otherwise keep together in a kit for future use. The disadvantage of kits is the fact that when something’s stashed in a kit (like a vial of SuperDuos I was looking for tonight), it’s not findable — unless there is a designated place for that kit. Like a special, labeled drawer.

Right now I have a toolbox with — well, tools — but it is not large enough or organized enough to reasonably take my beads.

I’m thinking of putting what I can, into my flat storage. There’s not much point to my keeping my flat archives in that space and losing the use of it, when I could be putting actively used materials in there. There is the fact that if I did get a job in an Academic Library, and did go into making art at the graduate level, I might want some of this stuff as portfolio material (if I tried to get into an MFA program). But — not everything is portfolio-quality material.

At this point, I know that it would be best to store beads of the same shape and size, together. When I was younger, I mostly collected size 11/0 beads; they’re about 2mm long (smaller sizes have higher numbers; thus, 15/0 is smaller than 11/0, and 8/0 is smaller than 6/0). This is…very small to me, now. As an 11-18 year old, 2mm is fine. As someone whose eyes are aging, it’s not the size I want to work at, unless there actually is a reason for it.

That makes me sound kind of old. Not that there’s anything wrong with old (I prefer myself at this age to myself with less experience and understanding), but still. I’m watching everyone around me aging, and I’m physically aging, as well. What I mean, partially, is that when you’re small and your vision is better (like when you don’t routinely get eye strain and unclear vision from not wearing your glasses), tiny beads don’t seem so tiny.

Mostly, when I’m working with micro-macramé, I’m not going down to 11/0 size beads, even though it is possible with standard C-Lon cord. A lot of that is just a convenience factor. When being threaded, 11/0 beads tend to flex the C-Lon and then launch onto the floor, where they bounce and roll and get underfoot: that’s a risk of broken glass, if they’re lost. Beadweaving with 11/0s is a different matter, mostly because it’s a very different process; needles don’t spring the beads away. (I draw the line at sizes smaller than 15/0. [I wonder what it would be like to be nearsighted–!])

I’ve done a lot towards the end of organizing vials and hanks of beads, moving through storage solution after storage solution. First it was plastic shoeboxes; then milky plastic stacking organizers; then tubs from IKEA; then free-standing vial holders (which are still useful); now clear drawers and sampling vials (also useful). The major issues are the fact that most of these storage solutions are temporary, in that they stop being available; and that the level of use of each of these sizes and colors and shapes of bead really should have a say in how I store them.

I’m just not sure how to implement that — especially as mixing the beads up encourages “happy accidents” which would not otherwise occur. There’s the possibility of building a database…which I’m probably more prepared to do than most people, but that’s — seriously! — a lot of thought and a lot of work.

I also don’t know if I can reasonably reformat a database that I create and then can’t properly delete (this has to do with table dependency…not to bore you with the details, but tables [think spreadsheets, but fragmented according to purpose, and more organized] must be created and deleted in proper order to make sure things will function or be deleted properly, or that a table can be created without error, in the first place. This is part of relational database design and implementation, one of the only classes to recently frighten me).

The possibility of using a purchased database system (right now, I’m thinking of Access, because it likely natively integrates Excel tables; but Access likely doesn’t look as good as, say, MariaDB, in a tech environment) has occurred to me, but the cost there is even more prohibitive. There are likely one or more free and/or open-source solutions that don’t involve cloud storage (I’m looking at some, now), but I’d have to be on top of my programming and querying skills to actually make that work.

I could do it. I just don’t want to (right now), because I’m not confident enough. It would be something that would make me a good candidate for certain jobs, though…

Then there is the question of what to do with the nine left-over beads from the 1990’s (fashion faux pas?) which I just used in a bracelet, or the eight rondelles that are taking up space in their own vial which is way too big for them, but the tiniest I have. I’m heavily considering moving back to tiny baggies; the environmental impulse in me just hates it because I know all plastic eventually disintegrates, and there’s no saving tiny baggies that shred from age. They have a lifespan — after which, they’re useless and basically just choke sea life.

Of course, there’s also the question of what to do with your vials, once the lids begin to crack and smell and decay. It’s not much better. At least the baggies don’t give off volatile compounds when they get old…

Right now I have six sets of clear plastic drawers (one here is empty; the third, I just began to use; the other two — I don’t recall what’s happening with them. Oh, right. One of those has hanks of Czech seed beads; the other has unique-to-the-collection beads, like multi-hole beads that wouldn’t fit with the other Czech glass). There are also at least four sets of small vials in transparent cases. I mostly use the latter as a way of visualizing color combinations, and have been using the beads from the vials. I have not had to refill one yet. I’ve also been reusing older, now-empty clear vials that came with purchases, which are still functional.

I guess in this age, mitigating waste is a better option than mindlessly throwing things away. It would just be nice if there were a convenient, inexpensive, transparent, and scalable design solution that involved something that wouldn’t outlive me.

But yeah, I just described plastic…and the main drawback to using it. I’m confident something will eventually be developed, but it’s not here, right now.

Well, tomorrow I have three main things to look for at the bead store, and one optional:

  1. brass toggle clasp
  2. clearly green drop beads (3x4mm)
  3. green SuperDuos or MiniDuos.
  4. (optional) brown fire-polished beads

I think I can get the rest of it through other sources. I’m seriously considering selling, again, if not looking forward to, or planning on it…

…and none of this is going to help the fact that making designs that are actually creative and unexpected, comes only from getting a bunch of stuff out so I can see it all at once. (“Yes, a bracelet came from this disaster zone. Why?”)