beading, craft, design, jewelry

Am I doing too much?

While I had thought I would not go the the recent bead show, my folks insisted. This is largely because after having visited General Bead, I started looking again at the Garden of Beadin’s website, to see what I was missing. Unfortunately, that website was not entirely functional for me (which is the reason I’m not linking it), so we went to the bead show to pick up a paper catalog, in person.

That…was a good thing. The paper catalog is much easier to navigate than the website, and it’s possible to buy things without submitting any sensitive information. I also happened to find a table run by the daughter of the person who runs the store, Beads On Main — the latter of which, I recognized from the old Oakland bead shows.

So…because I hadn’t been through the entire show yet, I didn’t realize that she was one of the only vendors there who focused on multiple-hole beads. If I had a clearer idea of the entire convention, like if I had been there for more than a couple of hours, I probably would have bought more from her. As it was, I was trying to conserve my funds (in case there was something which I really wanted, and couldn’t otherwise obtain).

For better or worse, I did end up purchasing three little cabochons…for which, I will need to either make metal or bead settings. I spent some time going through these undrilled things that I’ve collected over the years…what stands out to me is the fact that the cabochons I’ve bought which were from beading suppliers are less regular in their shoulders (and backs) than the ones I’ve bought from jewelry (that is, metalsmithing) suppliers.

The “shoulder” of a cabochon is the transition zone between the edge of the cabochon and top of the cabochon. In an ideal piece, the shoulder would be present, and the same height all the way around, making it easy to roll a bezel wire over the edge. I didn’t know this when I picked up a couple of fused dichroic glass cabs (probably more than a decade ago); and obviously, neither did those who made the cabs I’m talking about.

In some areas, the shoulders in these pieces are much higher than in others, meaning that these cabs require special (looped) settings. I wouldn’t have been able to tell this, however, without using a caliper to go all the way around the edges. With a caliper, the difference between professional-grade stone cutting, and everything else, is obvious.

I do know now, however, which cabs to prioritize for bead settings: the ones with low or no shoulder, and the ones with irregular shoulders. These can be used in bead-embroidered settings. The thing that’s stopping me from using them right now is the fact that bead embroidery implies the use of adhesive to hold the cab in place while it’s being sewn in.

I do have adhesive that I believe will work; the thing is, I hate to glue anything if I don’t have to. (This is largely because I was cautioned away from it in Metalsmithing classes; it requires more work than glue to set a stone securely.) Also, my two strongest adhesives (E-6000, and G-S Hypo Cement) are both toxic before they cure, which is a deterrent to my using them.

I also know that there are some cabs (like jaspers and agates) which would probably look nicer in metal, to preserve as much of the front display area as possible. The only drawback to working with metal is the fact that I have to use fire with it (innately hazardous), unless I go for cold connections and wire wrapping or wire weaving, which I’m not planning on doing. It’s way too easy to chip a stone, or break a wire.

It’s not the end of the world to break a wire, it’s just frustrating. Keeping the wire supple and un-kinked throughout the weaving process requires a dowel (or pen) and awl, at least. I’ve just done enough of it to know how it ends up looking, and how tough it can be. Using fire might actually be easier.

I’m also a relative newcomer to designing metal components. I’ve done it before, it’s just that it’s an entirely different workflow than working with beads, so I’m not used to it. There is a lot more room for innovative design when you’re cutting all the pieces out of metal sheet and wire, rather than fitting together small pre-made components.

I’m thinking that my major challenge will be figuring out how to integrate beadwork and metalsmithing. I know it can work, I’ve done it before. I haven’t, however, seen too many other people doing it, likely because the skills are things you actually need classes or apprenticeships to learn. I do know of places where people can learn, and I’ve seen beadworkers using torches…but handheld butane torches are pretty much not comparable to acetylene (which is what I used in class). I haven’t yet tried propane.

Anyhow…since that time, a class I’m taking has kicked in, and I’ve been dealing with work stuff. A lot of the time since the weekend, I’ve just been studying about situations I’d need to deal with if I were a Librarian. This is compounded by the fact that I did take a Civil Service test for the latter position, and didn’t score too poorly on it…I really need to keep applying, though.

Right now…I have also gotten a book on basic beadweaving stitches, which includes St. Petersburg and Chenille stitches. I am not practiced on either of the latter, so I’ve been wanting to get into it. Why I haven’t, I’m not sure, except for the fact that I’m fatigued…I guess from work, the job search, the research for the job, and this class.

When I put it like that, it looks reasonable…

craft, glass beads, seed beads

GAAAA…Washing beads.

So…in lieu of going to the Walnut Creek Bead & Design show this weekend, I found myself in San Francisco and took the opportunity to look inside General Bead, a store I’ve long known about and never visited. I have checked out their website, but I don’t remember having come away from it with a good feeling. I decided to look into their physical storefront today.

The store itself was on Minna, in the South of Market (SoMa) area. Minna in this area is kind of…run-down. The storefront almost seems to be off of an alley (the alley being Minna itself), in a way which very much reminded me of Mr. Zebra off of Telegraph in Berkeley (down to the spray-painted facade…and the local aroma, common to most urban areas here, which…anyone who lives here will know).

On going in, we were immediately greeted by an employee, who explained the method for ordering materials. This was kind. It was also nice that the store inside is not as modest as the storefront would suggest. In particular, they have a lot of Czech seed beads, in bags and in hanks. However, most of the stock is behind the counter and not accessible to the public. One fills out a form and the staff retrieve the items, which disallows close inspection prior to purchase.

It was noticeable that they had barely any multi-hole beads (though I did find some “Piggy” beads — just not in colors I would want), which is something that I can understand, as it’s difficult to tell which shape will be in demand at any one time (and new shapes are being continually introduced). I wouldn’t be surprised if trying to keep up with the multi-hole bead craze put some of the bead stores I’ve known (particularly Baubles & Beads, in Berkeley), out of business.

And, okay, I’m just going to put it out here right now: one of the packs of beads I got from them has what looks like part of the carapace of the abdomen, and two legs, of some kind of bug. I don’t want to post an image. I don’t want to remember it. At first I thought that it was a scale of a tiny pine cone. Then I identified two shed legs inside the package. So…thaaat is the gross part that I’ve been trying not to talk about so soon, but I might forget about it if I don’t mention it now.

But to be understanding, a lot of these beads came out of bulk packages behind the counter, in boxes, to be sealed up on exit in take-home packs…it would be incredibly easy for insects to live out their entire lives back there. Eating cardboard and stuff. Considering what the surrounding area looked like, I wasn’t entirely surprised…

That’s not to say that I didn’t like the experience, once inside the store. That’s to say that there are some bug issues, likely arising from the location.

I did take that hank of beads out (this was sealed at the store), and found a bunch of dust left behind inside the package. Then I went and got a fine plastic colander and bowl set that I purchased from the small Asian dollar store for $2 before it closed, and I used that as a large wash basin to wash the entire hank of beads. In Dawn dishwashing detergent. Twice.

I probably could have done more, but I passed the point of, “squeaky clean,” to the point that the oil from my hands began rubbing off on the beads. Because I am somewhat paranoid about germs…I didn’t want to wash these things until my hands cracked. There’s a fine line between being clean, and being so germ-phobic that one inadvertently exposes oneself to more than one has to.

These were rinsed many times, probably for about as long as I washed them, or longer.

Then I took them and put them in a little yogurt cup with some soft disposable hand towels, where they will be drying until at least tomorrow. I don’t recall having washed an entire hank of beads in this way in quite a long time, if I ever have at all. However, this is the third cup of beads I’ve washed, tonight.

Another was a set of what appear to be White Heart 4mm round druks from Michaels; that is, round beads with a white core (visible at the drill holes) and something red on the outside (red glass? a layer of dye?), which did bleed (brownish) a little. (Not all druks are white at the core; this is the first time I have bought a set like this, and it was accidental. I did buy actual solid-color transparent red druks, today. The thing is, it’s hard to tell that they’re red, because [as is my constant lament] the color is so intense. The White Hearts, on the other hand, are visibly red, which is why I got them.) I had set these aside primarily because I wasn’t sure if they were colorfast, but they’re seeming to hold up well.

The other wash round, this time, was two sets of Brown Iris Czech Ring beads (from General Bead), which I have since determined cannot be used with the inside of the hole, visible. This is largely because the beads themselves are not finished on the insides of the holes. The outside edges are fine. The inside edges are not. On top of that, I’ve noticed some crazing on the surface of most of these beads, probably from internal stress on the glass. They’ll just have to be used with that in mind. I have a use for them; I largely washed them because sometimes beads will just get dust on them, and it’s hard to see what they actually look like.

I’ve bought Ring beads on two other occasions, and can’t recall if they were similarly unfinished on the insides. The Olivine-color ones, which are 9.5x3mm and which I got a long time ago, are relatively fine on the outside and inside, and not crazed, though they also do look a little frosted and rough in the center. The Black ones I have, which are 8×2.5mm, look a little less finished on the inside edges, and I can’t tell if there is any crazing, because they’re black.

The ones I got this time, which are Brown Iris (basically a multicolored metallic finish, but more durable than Galvanized finishes at least were,at one time), are 7.5×2.5mm. Now that they’re drying, they don’t look too bad; rather like unfinished metal; but they still look unfinished, like the inside is not meant to be seen.

The big thing that I like about General Bead is its selection of size 6/0 Czech seed beads, which have been a bit difficult to find locally since Baubles & Beads went under. I believe the smallest pack of these available is 50 grams, which is about twice the size of a B&B vial (which I believe was 22 grams, though I’m not sure, especially as I don’t think it was noted at the store, and I don’t have a gram scale); the cost is also very decent, at around $3.50 for most of the 6/0 packs I bought. So that’s basically like paying $1.75 for a 25-gram tube (this could be the reason Yelp lists General Bead with only one “$” out of a possible “$$$$”).

The drawback I can see here is that a lot of their stock is either solid-color and opaque, or solid-color and transparent, without much funny surface treatment like Vitrail or Celsian or Apollo, or foil- or color-lining. Not that I miss the color-lining. :) However, transparent beads (even large ones) have a tendency to drop back in compositions. Solids tend to advance, as do metal-lined beads. But still, it is nice to have some subtle effects…like the Copper-Lined Rose Matte (Aurora Borealis?) beads I left there because I was pretty sure they were dyed.

I have read a lot of things about surface treatments not being permanent on Czech seed beads, however (and have had this issue before with Picasso beads, which are mottled from a surface treatment [some of which rubbed off, especially on my thread, while others did not]), so this could be a durability issue.

They did have some nice finds there, though, like bobbins of Super-Lon beading thread and Conso beading thread. I picked up a sample of each, to see if I like working with either. Also, there are odd sizes of Czech seed beads below size 6/0, almost down to the size of freakin’ sand; where you go, “how does anyone see these/fit a needle through these?” Their selection of druks and Fire-Polished beads is decent. They also have — man! — glass cabochons! In different colors! I picked up a few of these, just to practice bead embroidered bezels.

With that, I think I’m gonna go, for now. I realize I haven’t put up photos…I will either post a separate entry with photos, or come back to this entry and insert photos, later. I should have time tomorrow, before the sun sets.

beadweaving, craft, glass beads, organization, storage

Tiny baggies, and color scheme revision.

A bunch of time I spent today, taking beads out of vials and putting them into tiny plastic baggies. I am not sure I need to say this, but it’s much more space-friendly. And the baggies don’t smell bad (at least, not yet), unlike the vials I had them in before. (These weren’t bead-store vials, these were plastics-store vials.)

I am also making a move to repurpose the beads in my “pink” kit. The color scheme was just not exciting enough to motivate me to work on it…not to mention that the kit was at least two years old. And once I realized that I would not easily be able to incorporate the cabochon I had wanted to incorporate, into a Chevron Stitch and/or Netting collar — at least in the way I had wanted to — it kind of took the wind out of those sails.

Also…the color thing. There are so many more awesome color combinations possible than pink + purple. Right now I’ve kind of got a dragonfly-type thing going with violet, green, blue-green, copper, and some pinks. I’m not sure that I’ll be able to use all the colors within the same project, though — it may turn into two or more.

I know the initial reason to even try the original color combination was to use the “Peaches & Cream” daggers I got…probably a decade ago (it was a risk I took because the bead store I bought them from was good at supplying one-off glass combinations, never to be seen again), but the color scheme that I had to use them, was just way too delicate.

Right now, I’m also fairly distant from the last time at which I was interested in lacemaking…which I can see reflected in the last intended design for that piece. I’ve got some Galvanized (metallic) pinkish beads now that I didn’t, two years ago…if I use them as a mainstay, I may have something. They’re basically the color of freshly-cut copper…like the silvery-pink it is, before it even gets the chance to tarnish. (The color name is “Galvanized Sweet Blush”.)

I’ll need to at least acknowledge in the future that buying unusually-colored beads for the fact that they’re unusually-colored, means that they are likely to be design challenges (even though they will expand my current repertoire). That is part of the fun of it, but still, I would like to figure out just what colors are built to stay around, and which are trends. Sometimes this is easy, like cobalt blue versus matte neon yellow; most other times, it is hard to tell. I do still have some quite-old beads, though (1990’s vintage), that do “date” a piece if they’re too forward in it. I mean, they are from a 1990-era fashion color palette, which I have since learned is not neutral. :)

The other thing I realized today is that if I’m keeping my beads in transparent plastic storage, I will want to keep that storage out of direct sunlight. This is largely because the plastic these are made from (I believe this is unexpanded polystyrene) is likely to become brittle if I let direct sunlight routinely fall on them. I already have one case that is cracking, and I’m not entirely sure if it came that way or not (though I think it did).

Also, some but not all of the beads stored in transparent storage may fade on direct long-term exposure to UV light. This is more likely in dyed and color-lined beads. As I think I said a little earlier, dyes and color linings are ways to get colors in glass beads which are not otherwise easily formulated in solid-color glass. I’ve been veering away from using them, except for the fact that, well, there are effects possible with them that expand design possibilities.

Anyhow, I can store a lot more in the same space in little bags than I can in just vials, and for now I have enough. I don’t know what this collection is going to end up looking like, or if it’s going to be transitional forever. I’m thinking, now, that the latter may be the case (at least until I can find a storage system that reliably works). So…I mean, I may deliberately not want to purchase more of the “palette” style storage. I’m not too sure about that assertion, but it’s a serious possibility that I could find a more efficient, and longer-lasting, method.

beading, beadweaving, beadwork, glass beads

Getting back to one of those projects…

Despite feeling what seems like pretty severe eye strain (could this be what I’m interpreting as fatigue?), I’m up. I just put on my glasses, so we’ll see if that helps. I also took photos of the project I mentioned on March 4, then again on March 6, and didn’t show images of. This is largely because taking useful photos is easier when the sun is out, and because I am not really looking forward to dealing with camera focus issues and GIMP 2.

Then again, I am not really looking forward to paying over $100/year for Photoshop CC either (especially after my Elements program broke), so there’s that.

Anyhow, I can show you what I was working on.

Beaded samples

To the left, here, we have a photo of a few different samples of the same weave. If you’re versed in beadweaving stitches, this is basically an embellished double-needle ladder-stitch pattern.

That is, it’s a lot easier than it looks. Right now I have purchased some more clearly green beads (Chrysotile and Chrysotile Celsian), which I might be able to use with the Green Iris, to the left there. The thing is, the Chrysotile beads are both SuperDuos, whereas in all of these samples, the center row is made up of MiniDuos. MiniDuos are subtly smaller than SuperDuos.

This means that a bracelet which does not utilize MiniDuos will be a little longer…meaning the embellishments will likely sit a little differently.

I believe I majorly leaned off of further exploration of this pattern because of needing to clean up — and wishing to collect all my SuperDuos into one place. It’s cleaner, now…not totally clean, but there is free table space.

The only thing sitting between me and playing around with this some more, is studying more about Reference interactions…which I don’t want to do, which means I need to find something that I do want to do, besides sleep.

Maybe exercise?

personal

Self-care writ large.

Today…I was wiped out from having gone to the gym, yesterday. It’s the first time I’ve overtly exercised in months, if not years. Little did I know that not only would I get sore muscles and slight weight gain, but also an urge to sleep that would last at least 24 hours.

The day before that, I drove for the first time in months, and it wasn’t as scary as (from not having driven) I thought it would be.

Of course, I believe it was the day before that in which I cleaned two rooms in my house, which needed to be cleaned from last year.

I am thinking this all qualifies as, “self-care,” for real. At a certain point I knew there were more important things to be doing than buying beading supplies, and beading.

It doesn’t hurt that at three of the places I applied for jobs, they have now gotten back to me, and I will be notified if I’m selected for an interview. At the fourth place, I’m due to take a placement exam early next week.

I had been trying to study for this by reading up on what I wasn’t taught in my Reference Services class. That totally went out the window, today (I slept through the vast majority of the daylight hours).

I also missed produce shopping, as I was too tired to get out of bed for something optional, this morning. I think I got up in the early afternoon to eat, stayed up for a couple of hours, then went back to sleep. (I slept until I kept having dreams about waking up.)

As for beading, I haven’t done much of that at all for the last several days. I have a class set to start in a couple of weeks, which will also cut down on my available time. I’m thinking of working through the class more rapidly than asked or expected, especially as I’ve been through a class like it, once before.

Right now…I’ve got to admit to being tired, again. I suppose the reason could be something like fighting off the illnesses people around us seem to be affected by…especially as one person in particular smelled sick to me, at work. It’s better to get enough sleep to fight off an illness than it is to fall ill, I guess.

In any case, I did get the flu vaccination for this year, so that could be the reason that I’m just sleepy, instead of sick.

That actually makes sense.

I had wanted to write about this before tonight, but I realized that a lot of the details would be better left to paper hard copy, not shared with the world on my blog.

In a couple of weeks I’ll have at least a few things going on…more than now. Not to mention that I may have job interviews.

So I’m thinking that over the last several days I kind of came out of “vacation mode” and began really dealing with taking care of myself. I’m not sure what precipitated the change…

craft, personal

Things to do that I almost forgot: Japanese language study, and coding.

I really didn’t do anything creative today, but I made the experience of living in this house a little more pleasant, at least for myself. I’m hoping to leave some notes here for the future, as to what I can do in the daytime which will be constructive, other than beading, hanging out on social media, and reading. When I get to a certain point where my focus has narrowed to an extreme, it becomes difficult to think of different things to do, or to change focus.

I did take some time out to clean my office and bedroom. I had forgotten how good it felt to have clean carpet underfoot! Wrapping up my hair was a good thing, because I did end up getting very dusty. I may have to wash my hair tomorrow, despite it; my scalp feels a little itchy, still. I might also have to wash my blankets; the drawback of not making the bed every day is that dust and germs can accumulate, there.

I was also able to let in some fresh air, which was much nicer than expected. The windows have been shut as it’s been so cold outside, but the coolness was nice today, because I was working so hard, the sun was out, and it was in the low 60°s F outside.

The little Umbrella plant still hasn’t been repotted, though it got some direct sun, today. :) (I’m not sure that’s a good thing.) I also have everything I need for it, so it’s just a matter of when I’m okay with getting soil and gravel on the table and floor. :)

After I had gotten a considerable amount of work done, I was able to return to the aspect of my life which is at least nominally work-related…that is, the books in my office. I have a good number of Japanese language learning books which I just haven’t gone back to (maybe because I keep getting discouraged from having to pull away from my studies?). I want to get back to learning this, particularly as it’s a transferable skill that I might need.

As well…hmm. I need to at least be reviewing my coding, if not learning new aspects of it. I did see today that I do have somewhere where I can load and run databases. I’m just not at all sure that I’m up to the task (meaning that I probably am, and that I know enough to have trepidation towards it).

Yes, it is weird that those are two language-related skills…

Anyhow…I’m not entirely certain what to do about my yarn projects. I have one which has been in my bedroom for months, although it’s still not finished (I saw the specter of running out of yarn, and got nervous), and I haven’t really worked on it since I brought it in. Then, I had started to work on teaching myself to knit (with wool), but at this point…I know it’s very expensive in terms of time, and I don’t know that it’s worth it.

If I did work with yarn and knitting…I have a strong desire to work one or more lace shawls or wraps and eventually gain the skill to incorporate beads into them. Cowls are also good; the thing is that if I end up in a warmer climate…they may not be anything I can use.

I have decided to keep a book (Knit and Crochet with Beads by Lily Chin, 2004) which shows different ways to integrate beads into knitting and crochet…because I don’t know when I’ll run across another like it. It’s actually quite a useful book, if you’re into that sort of thing…I just don’t know if, in the near future, I will have the luxury of enough free time to deal with something like this.

But maybe repetitive fine motor movements will be enough to soothe my anxiety…I believe I have memorized the pattern for the blanket in mid-process, sitting here next to me.

I just realized that embroidery and sewing seem to have slipped my mind altogether, but I should try not to forget them.

There’s more stuff going on, but it would be in my best interest not to get into it right now. I will say that it may be useful to do some reading on Informational Interviewing, or possibly in that introductory book I’ve been interested in and never read, because I didn’t foresee a career in the work of which it spoke. However…at this point I know I’m not socially inept; I could teach crochet or beading or knitting, if I knew what I was doing, and teaching helps bring people together…

organization

I feel kind of bad, for not wanting to make a bead database.

However, making a database to catalog my beads, is overkill. At the end I would have something that could be utilized for (at least a section of) a small bead shop. Do I really want that? No. Not unless I want to be the Inventory Manager for a small bead shop…which I have thought of…

I have, however, thought of taking the label-maker and labeling different storage areas. It would be a step in the right direction. Then, when I separate out beads into these areas (as with the kits I occasionally create), I can note which drawer they’re in, or something. That way, when I’m looking for a specific tube of beads and I know it’s in a kit, and I don’t remember where I left it, I can look back at my records and the last action date, and it will give me a place to begin looking.

The major issue I can see right now is not having recorded (or even, sometimes, not even having the data to record) the descriptive information on each type of bead I have. This collection dates back to the 1990’s, so it’s likely that there is data that has been permanently lost (particularly price, initial quantity, and color name), because I didn’t think it mattered.

I guess I could remedy this by making a numerical Item ID field (with information correspondent to a record on each bag or vial…reminiscent of what I’ve seen in use, in bead stores, and in my library), but somehow that also seems to be overkill…

And I find myself going off-track with this stuff. I was on a roll until I tried to bring Information Science into it…whereas I think I was good before, because I was doing what I wanted to do (making jewelry), not what I thought I was supposed to be doing (organizing).

Anyhow, I still need to re-pot my Dwarf Umbrella Plant, and clean my bedroom and my office. It’s not like I really want to do either of the latter two things, but it will help. I’ll just have to take (yet another) shower, tonight…though if I bind up my hair right now, it will be much easier.

I should also remember to look at my records here, if I find myself without any idea of what I should be doing…

Business training

Bead database?

I’m not sure if this is a good thing or not, but the biggest thing I have to report is that building a set of spreadsheets detailing each bead type, cost, color, and location, is a bit forbidding. However, it could make for an interesting project, if I were to design a database for this information (just for practice, and to show to potential employers).

This would take me from my 202 class, through Relational Database Design and Implementation, and possibly further, into actualization…though that does mean that I have to do further work in programming. I would likely be using some form of SQL (Structured Query Language) for information retrieval. That means that once I get to the point of having tables in the correct configuration, and have populated those tables with data, I would need to run some type of SQL queries in order to retrieve anything.

Data entry is its own big thing, though.

To create a database of this type, I need to analyze my needs; isolate the information categories and types that would fulfill those needs; create a Data Dictionary to standardize data entry among the different categories; organize those categories into conceptually-related tables; determine the relationships between the tables; determine whether each pair of tables is in a one-to-one, one-to-many, or many-to-many relationship; determine the keys for each table upon which all else depends; normalize the tables; create the tables in proper order within a database program so that they build upon themselves; populate those tables with information; then create structured queries to retrieve needed information.

It’s a lot of work just to get to the end point of knowing where I’ve stowed things. I mean, I could just look (because my collection is small enough, for now). Not to mention that I’ve brainstormed 24 descriptive fields so far that would be ideal to include, though some of these are dependent upon others. For instance, beads of Type, “seed”, would include an “aught” category, whereas no others would. Also, I could include different “Size” and “Appearance” tables, so that I would only have to put in a masstone color (e.g., “blue”), once, and be able to mix and match those variables across items.

I guess…if I want practice, here’s practice. And it’s practical…practice.

I’m too tired to think about this now…but I still have my texts and my notes and old assignments. Maybe even my slides. I can review, tomorrow.

color, drawing, fine arts, organization, painting, storage

Yes, organization profoundly impacts usage.

Today has been full of organizing things, though most particularly my art stuff. While I was doing that, I found the majority of the 2-D work I did that still speaks to me, was done in ink, or in paint. I also did a major rearrangement of my flat storage and of my bead and craft storage (though I just now realize that I didn’t touch the papercrafting section, or anything that had to do with metalwork).

I’m getting rid of a bunch of art from Community College and before, which isn’t portfolio-quality…and to be honest, I’m not going to miss most of it. Basically, a lot of it just records my growth (or was, at one time, a medium for it), and has been taking up space in my flat storage. Having so much stuff just taking up space, I think, has led me to the point of thinking that I’ve already done what there is to do…which is not a mindset to cultivate, in the Arts.

I realize now that I love color — more than that, I love solid color, and the character it gives things. That seems to peg me as more of a painter than someone into drawing, but as I think I’ve mentioned before, drawing organically led me into painting (as I realized the limitations and encumbrances of drawing, and dry media).

At this point, I’ve got to wonder if transparent watercolor will lead me into acrylic (I’ve done work in both, and acrylic enables more spontaneity, for me, as opacity is achievable). However: gouache is a step between the two (Acryla Gouache moreso), and the working methods between transparent watercolors and gouache aren’t even similar. That is if I could be said to have developed a working technique for gouache, which I’m doubting, at this point.

I’ve decided not to work in oils for now, though water-soluble oil paint would be a first step. (Yes, it exists.)

The thing is, dealing with shape and fields of color, as versus line and mark exclusively, is a newer thing to me than drawing, and so I can start with a drawing and then add color, and the effect is not really like the monochrome that it was before. I’m not entirely sure what to do about this, but I’m thinking it’s a point to grow on. The benefit of using transparent watercolor is that I can still let the underdrawing show through. Gouache doesn’t allow this, unless the painting is approached very delicately, from the start.

In regard to acrylics, though: I’ve also discovered that I have a good number of boards (hardboard, canvas board) to practice on — they just need to be gessoed over, and I can use my acrylic brushes from the Art program. I also have a couple of stretched canvases.

Do I know what to paint? No. I think it will have to develop organically: but I can start with still-lifes of flowers and produce. Or, I could do some throwaway graphite sketches in my cheap paper sketchbook, and see if anything comes up.

I’ve also got to hang a bunch of my work, though. That way, it can stop living on my bedroom table.

Today, I also resolved to make better use of the miniature sets of drawers that I’ve gotten. I’ve re-labeled what I could. I also refilled a couple of pens, which oddly enough haven’t clogged yet from non-use; and generally just put stuff away.

The types of beads which are more useful than others have also been getting clearer to me. For example, I would use Long Magatamas for kumihimo braiding (which is why I originally got them, before I realized that beaded kumihimo is difficult when you don’t know what you’re doing) — or maybe bead crochet (though I haven’t tried bead crochet with Long Magatamas yet); but because their holes are so large, I find them less well-suited for beadweaving, as they remain loose and relatively mobile. Because I dislike the aesthetics there, I may want to move them out of my prime storage areas.

I’ve also realized the utility of cheap paper sketch journals. I have one from a while back which I began to fill with sketches of imaginary flowers, including — I now realize — a set of remembered Alstroemeria sketches (I love Alstroemeria!) with the round and narrow petals reversed. It isn’t that the drawing is aesthetically unpleasant; it’s that it’s anatomically incorrect, like if you drew someone with legs for arms and arms for legs because you were unfamiliar with human anatomy. The people could even seem beautiful to an observer who also didn’t pay attention to human anatomy… ;) …and I’m having flashbacks to the Mannerism topic in Art History…

Probably, though, I shouldn’t let that stop me from drawing. The feeling was there, even if the accuracy wasn’t.

I’m actually kind of surprised at the effect I can get with just a pencil and paper…

I still have a lot more cleaning and organization to do, particularly where it comes to the bedroom and office. I also found a bunch of journals. Apparently I have a trait of making a new journal every time a sufficiently new topic arises. Like, I have a journal for rough drafts of blog posts; I have a journal for note-taking when reading nonfiction; I have a journal on jewelry design ideas, and one on things I learn while making that jewelry, etc.

I should catalog them. :)

personal

Sleepy.

Well — there’s not much to report, mostly because I got to bed so late last night that I ended up taking a five-hour nap, today. I did get to the bead store, but only found part of what I was looking for — which is okay, because I did find some stuff with which to experiment. I also have other sources.

The biggest thing I’m a little upset about is the fact that I lost the daylight hours in which I could have taken photos of the things on which I’m working. (I have recently found that it’s okay to end a sentence with a preposition; don’t be surprised if it happens, but right now, it’s mostly outside of my comfort zone.) :)

I have recently found that going to bed early and then waking early is…a relatively good thing. Going to bed at 10:30 PM, for example, and then rising at 5:30 AM is doable, even if it looks extreme when I write it down. Not only do I get extra time so that I can avoid rushing to start my day (and can take a shower without rushing, before work), but I have the opportunity to get more hours of sleep, if I need them. I also have the ability to brush and floss my teeth and do the whole pre-bed routine, without worrying about a time crunch.

Right now, I’m sleepy again, and am heavily considering just going back to bed. This is amazing.

I might as well set the intention, as well, to start cataloging my beads in spreadsheet form. Whether this will make it to a database is yet to be seen…