beading, glass beads, macrame, seed beads

Easter beading

In other arenas:

I need to buy a new roll of Alligator Tape; I was knotting today for the first time in weeks, and my skin was showing it.  The roll of Alligator Tape that is already here has somehow fused together into a solid mass.  It would have worked if someone had left part of the tape hanging loose, but as it was, it was…unusable.

The thing is, I’m so used to blisters on my pinky fingers in the same exact spot that by now, it doesn’t even really hurt anymore.  My only concern, really, is causing a break in the skin and getting an infection.  From my experiences in ice skating, and guitar, I know the only real annoyance or concern would be if I continued to irritate the area, or ruptured the skin.  I generally get my hands dirty when I go to work (the work I get paid for, that is), so the latter would be a cause for concern — but the only cause for concern.  And more likely it would just be the irritation of having to change a wet Band-Aid.

I did stop knotting tonight because my hands really couldn’t take it very well, and the Alligator Tape was useless.  I would like to be doing this more often, though — experimenting with beads, that is; not getting blisters.  I’m still inspired from the bead show from yesterday, and want to ride the high while I can.  So many people gathered around a love of beads!  This is why I was knotting tonight instead of reading for Marketing.  Because Marketing isn’t going to help a whole lot if I don’t build my skills and experience — unless I want to work full-time as a Marketer, and the thought is kind of…not my cup of tea.  To build skills and experience takes drive and work; and I felt moved to work today.  Because what I want to be doing is creating.  Not, particularly, convincing people that what I’ve made will fulfill their needs.  If I could have someone competent and ethical with integrity, who would be willing to do that for the salary I might eventually be able to pay, I’d gladly hand that part of the job off.

Today I was trying to learn how to tie basic horizontal half-hitches (from left and right) in a Cavandoli style, taking a cue from my wireweaving books.  Horizontal half-hitches, I am feeling confident enough on; though it still helps to look at the diagrams every once in a while to ensure I’m doing them correctly.  I started out trying to make a basic strap with scrap C-Lon and one new cord in a different color, totaling 8 strands.  Eventually, this turned into a “wonder if I can make a zigzag with beaded arcs” thing, and I broke out the 8/0 and 6/0 seed beads and fire-polished rounds and druks.

The good thing is that my druks and fire-polished beads do fit on the C-Lon (standard width) — the 8/0s and 6/0s, I already knew would.  Another good thing is that I finally figured out one good sizing formula for what beads to use where in order to make the arcs symmetrical and looking like they fit together.  It did take me a while (and two messed-up repeats) to be able to see how things should look if they’re correct, however.  When the center beads line up with each other, you’re basically golden.  It took a couple of hours, and the revelation that I could move repeats from side to side in order to place them at an appropriate “width” point, to be able to get there, though.  That is, it may not work to put a 6/0 at the minimum section of the sinnet’s arc, but it may work to put it one cord further in.

I do have a workable plan, with that now; and I’m thinking that, just to practice, I may make this pattern with the beads and cords I have.  The colors are kind of mishmash between bronze and green and seafoam and turquoise — the latter, because they were the only 3mm firepolished beads I had.  It works out, though.  I suppose that the colors may actually be linked via the presence of copper — I’m just not sure about the apple greens.  But then, I’m not sure of the colorants for most of the glasses I work with, with the exception of gold for pinks and reds, a high probability of copper for the aquas, plus cobalt for cobalt blue.  …The latter of which, I just remembered, I have stashed for a specific project.  I tend to forget these things until I see them again.

Last night, at about 3 AM, I was still running off of tea, and building a design for a stone donut that I’ve had unused for years.  I can still work on that design, but I don’t think that the pattern I made tonight with the knotting, is really one that would show off the pendant I made to best effect.  It distracts the eye too much from the donut itself.  I’m thinking of making a multistrand necklace for the latter, but I can only do this to best effect by attaching a backing, and then embroidering on an edging of beads through which to attach the necklace and fringe.  As I contemplated doing that, I realized that I didn’t have to sew on the central component so strongly or obviously.  If there would be backing, a central component can be sewn down through the backing and back out the top of the component without the need for tight and secure lacing.  As it is, there’s a weak spot in the donut where one of the drill holes is; there’s a fracture which runs parallel to it, which I didn’t see or feel until tonight.  I’m not sure if that’s my doing, or not.

What I want to do with that pendant is make a choker.  Maybe I will just resort to strands coming off the sides, plus fringe.  It would definitely be easier than trying to work macrame into the strap.  I also should have a good number of green firepolished beads around here…somewhere.  If I use glass, I could make it economical; if I matched the stone, I might be able to make it more elegant.  Or then, as I just recalled, I could make a beadwoven band out of something like …those bronzy-pink 11/0s and green iris 11/0s I have…Dutch Spiral stitch?  Regular spiral?  I could attach the cords, then, directly to the lacings on the stone.  And because it isn’t just a straight patterned stitch with no imagination, and the above stitches may be Public Domain (considering I’ve seen them everywhere), I might be able to sell the finished product.  But more likely, it will go into a portfolio.

I should not really assume “Public Domain.”  I should look it up, especially given that only a few publishers dominate the beading-pattern business (Kalmbach, Lark, and Interweave).  I may run across something proprietary without knowing it.

Things to think about…

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