drawing, fine arts, graphic design, painting

pens and thoughts on watercolors

Besides what I’ve mentioned in the prior entry…I picked up some little colored fineliners today which I’ve been coloring with for a while.  :)  I picked up a different orange than I intended to (it’s closer to red with a hint of orange), but it’s actually working out pretty well.  The orange which I intended to pick up would have been more expensive and also closer to the tone of the orange I definitely knew I was getting.  So now I have some Staedtlers (I’m just in love with Staedtler, I’m sorry), and a few Stabilos which I picked up because their color was nice.  These were around $1 a piece.

This is continuing the thread which I started with getting together with someone who encouraged me to draw.  The fineliners are really good for small detail work — where you need hard, sharp lines.  I did eventually get into the place, today, where I probably should have been using the bullet point on a Tombow or something — I was coloring in big areas of color with fineliners (!) and I don’t know how long they will continue to last if I continue to do that.  But I did happen to uncover an image which will look very good in a larger format, and which will look very different in different color schemes.  It’s excellent for gouache, as none of the color blocks touch each other.

So while I was at the art store…I was looking over the watercolors and the acrylics.  I think that for now, I’ll stick with watercolors (and gouache), and just try a different working method, which I’ve been practicing with my markers and colored pencils…just…not exactly the same.  :)  This involves using some of my very hard and light pencils to draw in an underpainting, so I know where the highlights are, prior to beginning.  Watercolors are much less expensive than acrylics, as well; so now I suppose I do know why many people start out in them, despite my personal belief that they’re more difficult to work with than acrylics.  I did happen to pick up a pad of two-ply Bristol Board which should suffice for exploratory ventures into watercolor, on a medium which won’t destroy fine detail.

…I wonder how it would look if I painted over transparent watercolors with gouache (which is opaque)?  I should keep that thought in mind, not count it out.  Just like I should not count out using watercolor pencils or watercolor sticks.

I mentioned that I picked up the Talens Angora watercolors last month, which ran about $6 for twelve pans.  I still haven’t used them, it has been somewhat intimidating; but I realized while looking back over recent work with the fineliners, that I needed to start working with the watercolors the way I started working with the fineliners.  I need to play around with the watercolors without a solid design in mind, most of all so I can find out how they behave.  So I suppose that should be coming up, soon.  (I have realized that a lot of what I set out to do, I do actually get around to — though that can be hard to see without records.)  I am relatively new to using brushes, so I suspect there will be a learning curve.  But at least I have access to a usable set of watercolor brushes.

beading, fabric

From steel to gold

I finally did it.  I made the jump.

I now have my own handmade gold-filled earrings in place instead of my surgical steel Captive Ball Rings.  And they don’t feel bad, either.

Looking back on it, within the past couple of days I had tried to reach a compromise between having the thick steel rings in and having more decorative jewelry in, by making small loops of Ultrasuede, wrapping the loops around the CBRs, and hanging dangles off of the bottom parts of the Ultrasuede.  It didn’t work, and this is mostly because the Ultrasuede frays too much.  As I was whipstitching the tiny bits of it, I saw that it wasn’t going to work; the threads of the Ultrasuede were sticking out beyond the stitching.  Maybe it would work better if I cut the material on the bias or something, but really I think I’ve given up on that.  :)

There is the option of using real leather, but I do not look forward to that for a few reasons:

1) It’s not hygienic.  It can’t be easily cleaned, and this matters if you have piercings.

2) I’ve heard of people with nickel sensitivities having allergic reactions to leather.  I know I have a nickel sensitivity, and I don’t want to risk sensitizing myself to leather.

3) If that weren’t enough, it’s difficult to sew (and I don’t want to ruin my milliner’s needles by trying to punch through suede).

There are a set of pearls which I obtained last month which I am now ready to make into earrings.  They’ve just been sitting around resting on 24 gauge gold-filled wire.  Even if I do mess up an expensive head-pin or two…I can still work on them, and at least I’ll finally be able to wear them.

Do I lose street cred because I took out my heavy-gauge earrings?  ;D  (I suppose the blessing is that I didn’t stretch my piercings to the stage where it would be difficult to go back.)

I have more to say, but it’s on a different topic, so I’ll put it in a different entry.